I think of Kuku Sabzi as the Persian's festive, herby, and flavor-packed take on frittata or omelet (in this case, baked omelet). I'm excited to share this version from the cookbook Milk Street: The New Home Cooking. More about the book and a great giveaway below!

Kuku Sabzi: Persian Herb Baked Omelet | The Mediterranean Dish. Light, herby, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet or frittata with tons of fresh herbs and beautiful spices that will have you coming for more. Perfect for your next special brunch! Get the full recipe on TheMediterraneanDish.com #eggs #breakfast #christmasbrunch #bakedomelet #frittata #mediterraneanrecipe #persianrecipe #kukusabzi

I’ve always enjoyed the flavors of Persian food, which aren’t too far from the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern flavors I grew up with. So, when I came across an easy recipe for Kuku Sabzi in the new Milk Street cookbook, I knew I had to make it!

What is Kuku Sabzi?

Kuku Sabzi is a traditional Persian omelet typically served at Nowruz (Persian New Year) --the herbs symbolizing rebirth, and the eggs symbolizing fertility.

Kuku Sabzi: Persian Herb Baked Omelet | The Mediterranean Dish. Light, herby, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet or frittata with tons of fresh herbs and beautiful spices that will have you coming for more. Perfect for your next special brunch! Get the full recipe on TheMediterraneanDish.com #eggs #breakfast #christmasbrunch #bakedomelet #frittata #mediterraneanrecipe #persianrecipe #kukusabzi

If its deep green color is any indication, kuku sabzi has loads of greens! In fact, the ratio of greens to eggs is heavily skewed towards the greens. In this recipe, it’s heaps of parsley, cilantro, dill and scallions; there are just enough eggs to bind them together!

Why this Kuku Sabzi Recipe works?

This kuku sabzi recipe is one heck of a solution to those fresh herbs wilting in your fridge. And you can certainly throw in other greens like baby spinach.

While kuku sabzi is traditionally prepared stovetop, I love the ease of baking. Helped by a little baking powder, you get an even lighter, fluffed-up omelet. Cranberries (in place of Persian barberries) and toasted walnuts add a little texture and welcomed flavor.

Kuku Sabzi: Persian Herb Baked Omelet | The Mediterranean Dish. Light, herby, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet or frittata with tons of fresh herbs and beautiful spices that will have you coming for more. Perfect for your next special brunch! Get the full recipe on TheMediterraneanDish.com #eggs #breakfast #christmasbrunch #bakedomelet #frittata #mediterraneanrecipe #persianrecipe #kukusabzi

I appreciate this one note from the Milk Street cookbook: Don’t use less than 2 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil to grease the pan. The oil should pool at the bottom and generously coat the sides. This crisps up the edges and boosts the omelet’s flavor. I couldn’t agree more!

You guessed it, I chose to use our Private Reserve Greek extra virgin olive oil. An exquisite buttery oil with fruity aroma and a low acidity of less than 0.4%.  You’ll notice hints of fresh green herbs, a mild bitterness and a peppery finish, which makes Private Reserve the perfect oil to compliment the flavors in this herby omelet.

Kuku Sabzi: Persian Herb Baked Omelet | The Mediterranean Dish. Light, herby, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet or frittata with tons of fresh herbs and beautiful spices that will have you coming for more. Perfect for your next special brunch! Get the full recipe on TheMediterraneanDish.com #eggs #breakfast #christmasbrunch #bakedomelet #frittata #mediterraneanrecipe #persianrecipe #kukusabzi

What to serve with this  Kuku Sabzi (Baked Omelet)?

Both Milk Street and Samin Nosrat, who is a renowned chef and cookbook author of Persian origins, suggest serving Kuku Sabzi with a side of yogurt.

But if you’re in my shoes, and you’ve just made a fresh batch of homemade labneh (yogurt cheese), you should totally serve it along!  Like yogurt, Labneh offers the balance of acidity next to this baked omelet. To complete the little feast, add fresh vegetables, olives and pickles.

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
Kuku Sabzi: Persian Herb Baked Omelet | The Mediterranean Dish. Light, herby, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet or frittata with tons of fresh herbs and beautiful spices that will have you coming for more. Perfect for your next special brunch! Get the full recipe on TheMediterraneanDish.com #eggs #breakfast #christmasbrunch #bakedomelet #frittata #mediterraneanrecipe #persianrecipe #kukusabzi

Kuku Sabzi: Baked Persian Herb Omelet


Description

Kuku Sabzi is a light, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet. This is an all-star, easy recipe with loads of fresh herbs! Perfect for your next brunch!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 tbsp Private Reserve Greek extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups flat-leaf parsley, leaves
  • 2 cups cilantro, leaves and tender stems
  • 1 cup roughly chopped fresh dill
  • 6 scallions, trimmed and coarsely chopped
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ¾ tsp ground green cardamom 
  • ¾ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 6 large eggs
  • ½ cup walnuts, toasted and chopped (optional)
  • ⅓ cup dried cranberries, coarsely chopped (optional)

Instructions

  1. Position an oven rack in the upper-middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Trace the bottom of an 8-inch square pan or 9-inch round cake pan on kitchen parchment, then cut inside the lines to create a piece to fit in the bottom of the pan.
  3. Coat the bottom and sides of the pan with 2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, turning the parchment to coat on both sides (the oil should pool at the bottom and generously coat the sides).
  4. In a food processor, combine the parsley, cilantro, dill, scallions and the remaining 3 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil. Process until finely ground (now, I like my herbs less fine, so I stopped the processor at my desired texture). Set aside for now.
  5. In a large bowl, whisk the baking powder, salt, cardamom, cinnamon, cumin and pepper. Add 2 eggs and whisk until blended, then add the remaining eggs and whisk until just combined. Fold in the herb-scallion mixture and the walnuts and cranberries, if using. Pour into the prepared pan and smooth the top.
  6. Bake in 375 degrees F heated-oven until the center of the egg is firm, about 20 to 25 minutes. (The egg mixture will rise, but will go down once you set it aside to cool.)
  7. Let the kuku cool in the pan undisturbed for 10 minutes. When ready, run a thin knife around the edges to loosen the kuku. Invert onto a plate and remove the parchment from bottom, then re-invert on another serving plate or a cutting board so the top of the kuku is facing you. Slice into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature.
  8. Serve with a dollop of yogurt. See more suggestions in the post under "what to serve with kuku sabzi."

Notes

  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 20 mins
  • Category: Breakfast
  • Cuisine: Persian

Keywords: Persian baked omelet recipe, healthy brunch idea

SHOP THE MEDITERRANEAN DISH

A word about Milk Street: The New Home Cooking

It’s hard for a foodie not to be a fan of Christopher Kimball's! I’ve followed his work for a while, more recently, his Milk Street Radio (podcast).

Milk Street: The New Home Cooking is a cookbook every cook should have. As only Christopher Kimball and his capable team can do, they've put together a great resource for home cooks. What I appreciate most about it is its global approach to food--searching the world for bold, simple recipes, and then adapting them for home cooks. You'll find 125 recipes --from the Middle East to Spain, Korea, Sweden and many more--all presented clearly and beautifully. If you're looking to change things up in the kitchen, you'll want a copy of this book!

To purchase a discounted copy of the book, head over to Amazon here.

Enter the giveaway below for a chance to win a copy of the book, courtesy of Little Brown.

Giveaway

U.S.A residents who are at least 18 years of age may enter this giveaway. Please read the terms and conditions in full before entering.

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

More Recipes to Try:

Middle Eastern Shakshuka Eggs

Homemade Labneh (Lebanese Yogurt Cheese)

Keftedes: Greek Meatballs Recipe

Sheet Pan Paprika Chicken 

Italian Apple Olive Oil Cake 

*Disclosure: No compensation was received in exchange for this post or giveaway. All opinions are my own. 

Kuku Sabzi: Persian Herb Baked Omelet | The Mediterranean Dish. Light, herby, flavor-packed Persian baked omelet or frittata with tons of fresh herbs and beautiful spices that will have you coming for more. Perfect for your next special brunch! Get the full recipe on TheMediterraneanDish.com #eggs #breakfast #christmasbrunch #bakedomelet #frittata #mediterraneanrecipe #persianrecipe #kukusabzi

Share it with the world

I'm Suzy; born and bred right on the shores of the Mediterranean. I'm all about easy, healthy recipes with big Mediterranean flavors. Three values guide my cooking: eat with the seasons; use whole foods; and above all, share! So happy you're here...
Learn More

Get our best recipes and all Things Mediterranean delivered to your inbox.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recipe rating

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Comments

  1. Love your rendition of Kuku Sabzi. The zeresk berry is called lingonberries in the states and I happen to have the shrubs that grow them in my yard. I love their sour taste. Thanks for posting all your lovely recipes.

  2. Made this for Christmas breakfast and paired it with roasted spiced sweet potatoes and red onions. I didn't add walnuts and used dried cherries instead of cranberries. I topped it with pickled red onion, yogurt, and goat cheese. My fiance, who is Iranian, ate half of it immediately. I saved half of my serving and it reheated well this morning! Yummy!

  3. Perrrrrfection! We eat keto and I was starting to get tired of our weekly Spanish tortilla. I adore fresh herbs, especially dill, so added a bit more of that. I had a cabbage that needed to be used so I cooked it until just soft and mixed that in before cooking - and since it's been so hot here, I just cooked it on the stovetop. Served with some homemade labneh with lashings of olive oil and a bit of fresh mint and garlic mixed in... a wonderfully refreshing dinner. Thanks!

  4. It's going to be interesting! I'm just watching Alton Brown on YouTube (Quarantine Quitchen #19), and they're cooking this.

    I'm very interested to see what they think 😉

  5. This recipe was great! From a persian grocer I got a dried mix of herbs for kuku (about 3 cups) and substituted this for the fresh herbs. I also tweaked the spices a little bit (I was short on cardamom, but added some tumeric and sumag). It's the first time I've made kuku sabzi for myself but it competes with some of the best I've had!

  6. hello I grew up on kuku and I have to say your version was great. I am starting Whole 30 at the beginning of the year and besides the baking powder in this recipe I would be able to get away with eating it. Any suggesting on what I can replace it with or do you think it would work without the baking powder? Thanks

  7. I haven't tried this dish, although I have tried vegetable frittata. My favorite way to cook eggs is to scramble them, or prepare deviled eggs. I'm looking for more egg recipes to try, so I think I'll enjoy trying this one.

  8. Thanks so much for sharing the Persian herb omelet recipe; I can’t wait to make it, it has all the herbs/ greens I love !
    I usually make a French omelet; something I grew up eating every Sunday .
    Suzy, I love, love each of your recipes!

  9. I can't wait to try this recipe but I'm not a fan of cilantro. Is there a substitute for cilantro or should I just leave it out? Do all Persians like cilantro? I loved it at first but ate too much of it on vacation and came home not wanting anymore.
    Thank you.

    1. Hi Annabelle! You can change up the herbs as you like. For example, leave out the cilantro and use fresh mint, or simply use more parsley and dill.